NEWS | April 10, 2014

The OMEGA Museum unveils new special exhibition

How the brand's 19 ligne calibre gave OMEGA its name and changed the world of watchmaking forever.

Coinciding with this year’s Baselworld watch and jewellery trade fair, the OMEGA Museum introduced a new exhibition to celebrate more than a century’s worth of timepieces whose roots can be traced to the brand’s 19 ligne calibre. At the time of its introduction in 1894, the movement boasted technology the world of watchmaking had never seen before. It was, in fact, among the very first movements whose crown could be used both to set the time and wind the watch.

The company’s founders were so impressed by the movement’s performance that they gave it the name “Omega”, the last letter of the Greek alphabet and a word equated with accomplishment and perfection. That name would be given to the brand in 1903. 

This special redesign of the OMEGA Museum’s first room highlights a number of significant pieces that demonstrate the brand’s progression through industrialized watchmaking technology and design.

Among the iconic timepieces on display are some models worth a closer look, including two pocket watches from 1916 with specially designed enamel finished cases. Three other pocket watches represent the evolution of the name and logo on the dials of some OMEGA’s earliest watches.

Also featured at this exhibition are the extraordinary watches that won the " Grand Prix " at the Exposition Universelle of 1900 in Paris and the 1925 Paris Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes.

On display there are several unique models from 1946 to 1951 with hand-crafted enamel dials.

As they near the end of the exhibition, visitors will find some of OMEGA’s most exquisite ladies’ wristwatches; some of these pieces feature a one-of-a-kind design and were worn only by their original owners before being acquired by the Museum.

These pieces lead the visitor to OMEGA's revolutionary Ladymatic model of 1955. On display are not only some of the most important variants of this family, but also the very movement that powered these ladies' watches: OMEGA's calibre 455, then the world's smallest rotor-wound automatic movement certified as a chronometer.

The pieces, movements and watchmaking details on display tell a story and take visitors on a journey through time from one fascinating showcase to the next. The new exhibition celebrates OMEGA’s contributions to the horological world and reveals the role the exclusive 19-ligne caliber plays in the brand’s heritage.

 

The OMEGA Museum unveils new special exhibition
The OMEGA Museum unveils new special exhibition
The OMEGA Museum unveils new special exhibition
The OMEGA Museum unveils new special exhibition
The OMEGA Museum unveils new special exhibition
The OMEGA Museum unveils new special exhibition